Creative imagination

Sometimes I encounter a situation that I do not know how to resolve. At the beginning of 2020, like every year for the last twenty years, I write my goals for the next twelve months. Since retirement, this discipline is even more important to me because I have entered a new chapter of life.

Each new year brings with it a challenge to review my financial situation, and I usually prune back some of my discretionary spending. I have already cut back a newspaper and a magazine subscription, and several small fry items from my budget.

One of my larger financial threats in 2020, is that I have a drop in income because of the expiry of an income protection insurance policy one year ahead of becoming eligible for my State Pension. How am I to bridge the income gap?

To help solve this problem and others, I have found using visualisation an essential ingredient in finding a solution. I begin by sitting quietly and listening to what my inner life is saying to me. Of course, as a Christ-follower, I believe that the Holy Spirit plays an important part in the revelation of what I see and hear. Although I do not want my blog to be a vehicle for an explicit expression of my faith, my faith is an indispensable part of who I am.

By sitting quietly, in a relaxed position and eyes closed, I can scan my life and permit the non-judgemental comment of my inner self to rise to the surface. When a self-comment or a new image emerges, I try to capture the dancing butterfly. Sometimes I will write down what I see or hear, other times, the strength of the impression is sufficiently robust for me to hold that thought.

The next phase of using my imagination is to ask ‘Is this feasible?’, ‘Is it sustainable?’ and ‘Is it wise?’ these foundational questions help me sort through the ideas to check if they have a valid connection with my real world.

As I have sought to develop my creative imagination, I have learned that I am bigger on the inside than I am on the outside. My inner world is my private Tardis, unappealing from the outside, vast and exciting on the inside; with places to go.

Recently, when listening to Anton Lesser reading Stephen Hawking’s book ‘Brief Answers to Big Questions’, I drew inspiration to consider the importance of creative imagination. In general, the book is a wonderful exposition of his ideas and a demonstration of Hawking’s creative imagination.

Developing our creative imagination aids us to free ourselves from the constraints of set thinking and to imagine a different future. Our static thinking so often limits our horizons and sets us on a course to narrow and predictable outcomes from which we cannot discover new possibilities.

When Einstein presented his theories during the first part of the 20th century, his mind lived his theories first, in his creative imagination. Take, for example, one of his first thought experiments. Einstein imagined what it would be like if he sat on the leading edge of a beam of light. In visualising the experience, he was able to see some of the strange properties of light, speed and time. This experiment caused him to think deeply about the nature of our world.

Einstein first visualised in his mind an experience that was not possible to see from within his knowledge of life so far. By doing so, his thought experiments took him outside of his limitations and into new possibilities. Then he worked on the mathematics to prove his theories or modify them, using the thought experiments to give a dramatised window on his spark of insight.

In thought experiments, we can first test whether what we see is capable of being a window on the here and now. Einstein’s thought experiments are not a device to dumb down explanations to less gifted mortals; rather, they are an essential central ingredient of his discoveries.

So, by developing our creative imagination, we can free ourselves from aspects of our life when we are stuck, bored or need to move forward. They may be used to overcome a problem or puzzle, as Schrodinger famously did with his cat, or to visit another world to see new possibilities, as Einstein and Hawking did.

We don’t have to be a famous scientist to use thought experiments. Our creative imagination will open new doors, and those new doors will lead us into new rooms. In new rooms, we will see previously unimagined possibilities, or solutions to our puzzles and unlock a way forward to a different outlook. Once we see fresh possibilities, we will also see our world differently, and the insights we gain will propel us to explore situations that we have not previously seen.

By using our creative imagination, we can live in a different reality in our minds, and this provides us with a means of experiencing something new for ourselves or others. Seeing a new future or new opportunities through a creative imagination energises us into becoming bigger people. And, becoming a bigger person starts on the inside.

7 Questions to help develop our creative imagination

  1. Do I think ahead?
  2. Can I visualise my life beyond its present reality?
  3. Do I use visualisation to shape my goals?
  4. Do I look for new and creative ways to solve problems?
  5. Am I able to appreciate the views of others?
  6. Can I still myself and listen to what my inner voice is saying?
  7. Can I catch the butterflies of thought that flutter across my mind?

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